Category: 90’s


Andrea Martin

imageAndrea Martin (born Andrea Monica Martin on April 14, 1975 in Brooklyn, New York) is a R&B singer, songwriter and producer.

She is known for writing & producing songs for artists such as Monica, Cece Peniston, Angie Stone, Toni Braxton and SWV.
imageIn 1989, she released her debut single “Dirty Love” on Next Plateau Records. It’s unknown how or if the single made any music charts at all.
imageIn 1995, Andrea released the single “Big Dave” on Dig It International Records. Like her first single, it’s unknown how or if it made the music charts.

A year later in 1996, she was featured on Organized Noize’s song “Set It Off” (which was featured on the soundtrack to the film “Set It Off”) along with Queen Latifah. The song was moderately successful on the R&B charts.

In 1997, Andrea was featured on Lil Kim’s single “Money Talk” which managed to chart at #40 on Billboard’s R&B Airplay chart.
imageIn 1998, she released her debut album “The Best of Me” on Arista Records. It’s unknown how or if the album made the charts at all.
imageThe lead single from the album “Let Me Return the Favor” peaked at #82 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #32 on Billboard’s Hot R&B Singles chart, staying on the chart for 17 weeks, making it her highest appearance on the Hot 100 to date.
imageThe second single released from the album, a cover version of Tracy Chapman’s song “Baby Can I Hold You” failed to make any impact on the charts at all.
imageThe last single from the album “Share the Love” peaked at #4 on Billboard’s Hot Dance Music\Club Play chart in 1999.

These days, Andrea continues to write & produce songs for artists such as Blu Cantrell, Melanie Fiona, Sean Kingston, Leela James, Fantasia, Jennifer Hudson and most recently, Paloma Faith in 2014.

To see a fan-made video for “Dirty Love,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Big Dave,” go to:

To see the music video for “Let Me Return the Favor,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Baby Can I Hold You,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Share the Love,” go to:

As a double bonus, here are two videos for songs that Andrea was featured on.

To see the video for Organized Noize’s song “Set It Off”, go to:

To see the video for Lil’ Kim’s song “Money Talk,” go to:

Little Ko-Chees And The X-Club

imageLittle Ko-Chees And The X-Club were a male rap group from Orlando, Florida. Not much information is given about them, but they were signed to Attitude Records.
imageIn 1992, they released their debut single “The 57th Blow” on CJ Records. It’s unknown how or if the single was successful on the charts. The song was benefited to the families that were affected by the L.A. Riots during that year.

In 1993, they released their only album “Holler at Me.” It’s unknown how or if the album charted at all.
imageThe lead single from the album “Booty Swang” peaked at #86 on Billboard’s Hot R&B Singles chart, staying on the chart for only 2 weeks.
imageThe follow-up single “Work Baby Work” didn’t appear to make much impact on the charts.

After that, it seems as if Little Ko-Chees and the X-Club faded into obscurity. It’s unknown what they’re up to these days.

To see a fan-made video for “The 57th Blow,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Booty Swang,” go to:

imageTalk Talk were a synth-pop\new wave music group from London, England. They began as a quartet that consisted of lead singer\songwriter Mark Hollis, drummer Lee Harris, bass guitarist Paul Webb and keyboardist Simon Brenner.

In 1975, Mark formed a band called The Reaction and in 1977, they recorded a demo for Island Records. After only one single, they broke up.

Through his brother, Mark was introduced to Paul, Lee Harris and Simon. Talk Talk was formed in 1981 & signed to the EMI record label. They supported Duran Duran on their tour later that year.
imageIn February of 1982, Talk Talk released their debut single “Mirror Man” which didn’t appear to generate a lot of success.

In April of that same year, their self-titled follow-up single originally peaked at #52 on the U.K. Singles chart, but it was re-released and fared better on the U.K. Singles chart, peaking at #23.

A remix of the song was moderately successful in the United States, peaking at #75 on the Billboard Hot 100, #63 on Billboard’s Dance Music\Club Play Singles chart and #26 on Billboard’s Mainstream Rock chart.
imageIn July of 1982, Talk Talk released their debut album “The Party’s Over” which peaked at #132 on the Billboard 200 and #21 on the U.K. Albums chart. It was certified Silver by the BPI for sales of 6,000 copies and also reached the top ten in New Zealand.
imageThe third single from the album “Today” peaked at #14 on the U.K. Singles chart.
imageThe fourth single from the album “Another Word” was released in Germany where it peaked at #25 on the music charts.
imageThe last single released from the album “My Foolish Friend” peaked at #57 on the U.K. Singles chart.

In October of 1982, Talk Talk supported Genesis at their reunion concert at the Milton Keynes Bowl in England.

In 1983, Simon Brenner left the group, making Talk Talk a trio. They later recruited Tim Friese-Greene to help record their second album. Tim became the de facto fourth member of the group although he didn’t play with the touring band and he was absent from Talk Talk’s publicity material.
imageIn January of 1984, Talk Talk released the lead single & title song from their second album “It’s My Life.”

The song became a hit for the group, peaking at #31 on the Billboard Hot 100 and topped Billboard’s Hot Dance Music\Club Play chart for a week in May of 1984.

In the U.K., the song peaked at #46 on the U.K. Singles chart and also peaked at #7 in Italy. It was re-released in 1985, but peaked at #93 on the U.K. Singles chart.

In 2003, No Doubt covered the song and their version peaked at #10 on the Billboard Hot 100.
imageIn February of 1984, Talk Talk released their sophomore album “It’s My Life” which peaked at #35 on the U.K. Albums chart and #42 on the Billboard 200 chart.
imageThe follow-up single from the album “Such a Shame” peaked at #49 on the U.K. Singles chart. In the U.S., the song peaked at #89 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #12 on Billboard’s Hot Dance Music\Club Play chart. It also topped the charts in Switzerland.
imageThe last single from the album “Dum Dum Girl” peaked at a low #74 on the U.K. Singles chart.

By 1986, Talk Talk abandoned their synth-pop music style and switched to a more art-rock music style.
imageDuring that same year, they released their third album “The Colour of Spring” which peaked at #58 on the Billboard 200 chart and #8 on the U.K. Albums chart. The album was certified Gold by the BPI for sales of over 100,000 copies.
imageThe lead single from the album “Life’s What You Make It” peaked at #16 on the U.K. Singles chart.

In the U.S., the song peaked at #90 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #26 on Billboard’s Mainstream Rock chart. The remixed version of the song peaked at #22 on Billboard’s Hot Dance Music\Club PLay Singles chart and #40 on Billboard’s Hot Dance Music\Maxi-Singles Sales chart.

Internationally, the song was successful in countries such as Australia, Belgium, the Netherlands and New Zealand.
imageThe follow-up single from the album “Living in Another World” peaked at #48 on the U.K. Singles chart and reached the Top 40 in countries such as the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland and Germany.
imageThe third single from the album “Give it Up” peaked at #59 on the U.K. Singles chart.
imageThe last single released from the album “I Don’t Believe in You” peaked at #96 on the U.K. Singles chart.
imageIn 1988, Talk Talk released their fourth album “Spirit of Eden” which peaked at #19 on the U.K. Albums chart.

Although the album was able to gain some cult status, it was commercially unsuccessful, had lack of promotion and panned by various critics.
imageThe only single released from the album was “I Believe in You” which only peaked at #85 on the U.K. Singles chart.

During the making of the album, Talk Talk’s manager Keith Aspden tried to get the group out of their record contract with EMI due to fears that there wouldn’t be enough money to make another album, but the label wanted to keep them on their roster.

After months of litigation, Talk Talk was able to get out of the contract, but they were sued by EMI, who claimed their “Spirit of Eden” album wasn’t “commercially satisfactory.” The case was later thrown out of court.
imageIn May of 1990, Talk Talk’s greatest hits compliation album “Natural History: The Very Best of Talk Talk” was released by EMI without the group’s supervision. The album managed to peak at #3 on the U.K. Albums chart.
imageIn March of 1991, EMI released Talk Talk’s remix album “History Revisited: The Remixes.”

Talk Talk didn’t have any part in making the album and they sued EMI for releasing their music without their permission. In 1992, they won their case and EMI agreed to withdraw & destroy any remaining copies of the album.
imageIn September of 1991, Talk Talk released their last album to date “Laughing Stock” on Verve Records which peaked at #26 on the U.K. Albums chart.

Prior to recording the album, Paul Webb left the group, reducing Talk Talk to only Mark Hollis and Lee Harris.

Although the album received favorable reviews from critics, the singles released from the album: “After the Flood,” “New Grass” and “Ascension Day” didn’t appear to make any music charts at all. In 1992, Talk Talk broke up.

While Mark Hollis focused on his family, Paul Webb rejoined Lee Harris & the two of them went on to form a band called .O.rang. Tim Friese-Greene began recording under the name “Heligoland.”

In 1998, Mark released his self-titled debut album, but later retired from the music business.

Paul also collaborated under the name “Rustin Man” with the lead singer of Portishead, Beth Gibbons and in 2002, he released an album “Out of Season.” Lee was featured on Bark Psychosis’ 2004 album “///Codename: Dustsucker.”

To see a fan-made video for “Mirror Man,” go to:

To see the music video for “Talk Talk,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Today,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Another Word,” go to:

To see the music video for “My Foolish Friend,” go to:

To see the music video for “It’s My Life,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Such a Shame,” go to:

To see the music video for “Dum Dum Girl,” go to:

To see the music video for “Life’s What You Make It,” go to:

To see the music video for “Living in Another World,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Give it Up,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “I Don’t Believe in You,” go to:

To see the music video for “I Believe in You,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “After the Flood,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “New Grass,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Ascension Day,” go to:

Tina Moore

imageTina Moore (born on October 17, 1970 in Racine, Wisconsin) is a female R&B singer from the ’90s\2000s.
imageIn 1994, she released her debut single “Color Me Blue” which peaked at #73 on Billboard’s Hot R&B Singles chart, staying on the chart for 6 weeks.
imageIn 1995, Tina released her self-titled debut album which peaked at #90 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart.
imageThe follow-up single from the album “Never Gonna Let You Go” peaked at #112 on Billboard’s Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart, #36 on Billboard’s Hot Dance Music\Maxi-Singles Sales chart and #27 on Billboard’s Hot R&B Singles chart, staying on the chart for 20 weeks. A UK garage remix of the song peaked at #7 on the U.K. Singles chart in 1997.
imageThe third single released from the album “All I Can Do” peaked at #48 on Billboard’s Hot R&B Singles chart, staying on the chart for 11 weeks.
imageThe last single released from the album “Nobody Better” peaked at #20 on the U.K. Singles chart.
imageAfter that, nothing much was heard from Tina until 2000 when she released her sophomore album “All in My Vibe” which peaked at #91 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart. It’s unknown if any singles were released from the album.
imageIn 2002, Tina released her third album “Time Will Tell” which failed to make any impact on the charts at all.

These days, it’s unknown what Tina Moore is up to these days. It seems as if she has faded into obscurity.

To see the music video for “Color Me Blue,” go to:

To see the music video for “All I Can Do,” go to:

To see the music video for “Never Gonna Let You Go,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Nobody Better,” go to:

Ms. Angela

imageMs. Angela (whose real name is¬†Angela Randle) was an R&B singer from the late ’90s. Not much information is given about her, but she was signed to Relentless Records.
imageIn 1998, she released a promotional CD called “Anything for You.” It’s unknown how or if it was successful at all.

After, nothing much was heard from Ms. Angela and it appears as if she has faded into obscurity.

[There are no videos available for this entry]

Onnie Wai

imageOnnie Wai was a male freestyle\dance singer from the early ’90s. Not much information is given about him, but he was signed to 101 Records.

In 1990, he released his only single “How Could You Hurt Me.” It’s unknown how or if the single made any music charts at all.

After that, it seems as if Onnie Wai has faded into obscurity. It’s unknown what he’s up to these days.

To see a fan-made video for “How Could You Hurt Me,” go to:

imageNanyka was a female freestyle\dance singer from the early ’90s. Not much information is given about her, but she was signed to 101 Records.

In 1990, she released her only single “Why Did You Go?” It’s unknown how or if the song made the charts at all.

After that, it seems as if Nanyka has faded into obscurity. She never released a follow-up single and her current whereabouts are unknown.

To see a fan-made video for “Why Did You Go?”, go to:

imageGina Lanze was a female freestyle\dance singer from the ’90s. Not much information is given about her, but she was signed to Tazmania Records.
imageIn 1994, she released her first single “I Will Carry On.” It’s unknown how or if the single charted at all.
imageIn 1995, Gina’s follow-up single “U Threw It All Away” didn’t appear to make much impact on the charts at all.

After that, it seems as if Gina Lanze faded into obscurity. It’s unknown what she’s up to these days.

To see a fan-made video for “I Will Carry On,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “U Threw It All Away,” go to:

Nikolina

imageNikolina was a female freestyle/dance singer from the ’90s. Not much information is given about her, but she was signed to Hot Apple Records.

In 1995, she released her only single “The Love That I Feel.” It’s unknown how or if the single made the charts at all.

After that, it seems as if Nikolina has faded into obscurity. Her whereabouts are unknown.

To see a fan-made video for “The Love That I Feel,” go to:

David Black

imageDavid Black (born in San Francisco, California) was an R&B singer from the early ’90s. Not much information is given about him, but he was signed to Bust It Records.
imageIn 1992, he released his only album “Loving Ain’t Easy” which peaked at #41 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart.
imageThe first single from the album “Nobody But You” peaked at #17 on Billboard’s Hot R&B Singles chart, staying on the chart for 15 weeks, becoming his highest chart appearance on the R&B chart to date.
imageThe follow-up single “It’s My Nature” peaked at #75 on Billboard’s Hot R&B Singles chart, staying on the chart for 6 weeks.

After that, it seems as if David faded into obscurity. It’s unknown what he’s up to these days.

To see the music video for “Nobody But You,” go to:

To see the music video for “It’s My Nature,” go to: