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Jessi Colter

Jessi ColterJessi Colter (born Mirriam Johnson on May 25, 1943 in Phoenix, Arizona) is a country music singer from the ’70s and ’80s. She was one of the few female artists to emerge from the “outlaw country” movement of the mid-’70s.

Born in Phoenix, Jessi was raised in a strict Pentecostal house where her mother was a Pentecostal preacher and her father was a race car driver. When she was 11 years old, she became the pianist at her church. After she graduated from high school in 1961, Jessi began singing in local clubs in Phoenix and during that same year, she married guitarist Duane Eddy.
lonesomeroadUnder her birth name Mirriam Johnson, she released two singles on the Jamie record label. Her first single “Lonesome Road” received airplay in several markets in the United States, but her second single “I Think I Cried Long Enough Over You” failed to attract much attention.

After that, Jessi didn’t record again for nearly a decade. She continued to tour with Duane Eddy until they divorced in 1968. The following year, she met and married country music artist Waylon Jennings who helped get her a record deal with the RCA Victor label.

In 1970, Jessi revived her singing career and with Waylon, they sang two duets together: “Suspicious Minds” (which peaked at #25 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart) and “Under Your Spell Again” (which peaked at #39 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart).
A Country Star Is BornIn April of that same year, she released her debut album “A Country Star is Born” which didn’t make the album charts nor did the lone single from the album “I Ain’t the One.” The album would be Jessi’s only release for the label and she left RCA Victor soon after.
i'm not lisaIn 1975, Jessi signed a record deal with Capital Records where the lead single from the album “I’m Not Lisa” became a hit, topping Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart for a week in May of 1975.

It managed to cross over to the pop charts where it peaked at #4 on the Billboard Hot 100 (making it her only highest chart appearance on the Hot 100 to date). The song also peaked at #16 on Billboard’s Adult Contemporary chart and was successful in Canada as well.

The success of “I’m Not Lisa” earned Jessi a Grammy Award nomination for “Best Female Country Vocal Performance” and a nomination from the Country Music Association as well.
I'm Jessi ColterDuring that same year, Jessi released her sophomore album “I’m Jessi Colter” which peaked at #50 on the Billboard 200 and #4 on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart.
blue eyesThe follow-up single from the album “What’s Happened to Blue Eyes” peaked at #57 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #5 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart (staying on the chart for 17 weeks).
You Ain't Never Been LovedThe b-side to the single “You Ain’t Never Been Loved (Like I’m Gonna Love You)” managed to peak at #64 on the Billboard Hot 100.

According to research, a survey of industry sources reveals that Capitol Records was releasing both “What’s Happened to Blue Eyes” and “You Ain’t Never Been Loved” at the same time for the country and pop music markets. There was confusion in the marketing when radio programmers were unsure of which single to play, so both songs charted on the Billboard Hot 100.

When Capitol Records recognized that an error had happened, they purchased full-page industry advertisements which said: “We’ve flipped. What’s Happened to Blue Eyes IS the single,” but by then, it was too late.

As part of Waylon Jennings’s program, Jessi launched a nationwide tour at the Santa Monica Civic Center in Santa Monica, California.
JessiIn 1976, Jessi released her third album “Jessi” which peaked at #4 on Billboard’s Country Albums chart and #109 on the Billboard 200 chart.

The lead single “It’s Morning (And I Still Love You)” peaked at #11 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 13 weeks. The follow-up single from the album “Without You” peaked at #50 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for only 7 weeks.
Diamond In The RoughDuring that same year, Jessi released her fourth album “Diamond in the Rough” which peaked at #79 on the Billboard 200 and #4 on Billboard’s Country Albums chart.
I Thought I Heard You Calling My Name
The single “I Thought I Heard You Calling My Name” peaked at #29 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 12 weeks.
MirriamJessi went on tour with her husband and in 1977, she released her fifth album “Mirriam” (which is based on her birth name).
I Belong To Him
The album peaked at #29 on Billboard’s Country Albums chart, but missed the Billboard 200, but the lead single “I Belong to Him” failed to make the charts at all.
That's The Way A Cowboy Rocks And RollsIn 1978, Jessi released her sixth album “That’s the Way a Cowboy Rocks and Rolls” which peaked at #46 on Bilboard’s Country Albums chart.
Maybe You Should've Been Listening
The first single from the album “Maybe You Should’ve Been Listening” peaked at #45 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 10 weeks.

The follow-up single “Love Me Back to Sleep” peaked at #91 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for only 4 weeks. In May of 1979, Jessi gave birth to her only child, Waylon Albright Jennings (also known as Shooter Jennings).
Leather And LaceIn 1981, Jessi and Waylon Jennings released a duet album called “Leather and Lace” which peaked at #43 on the Billboard 200 and #11 on Billboard’s Country Albums chart.
Wild Side Of Life : It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels
The lead single from the album “Storms Never Last” peaked at #17 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 12 weeks.
Wild Side Of Life : It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels
The follow-up single “The Wild Side of Life”/”It Wasn’t God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels” was a moderate hit, peaking at #10 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 13 weeks).

The title song “Leather and Lace” would later become a hit song for singers Stevie Nicks and Don Henley in 1981.
Ridin' ShotgunDuring that same year, Jessi released her eighth solo album “Ridin’ Shotgun” which didn’t make the charts.
Holdin' OnThe only song to make the charts was “Holdin’ On” which peaked at #70 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 4 weeks.
Rock And Roll LullabyIn 1984, Jessi released her ninth album “Rock and Roll Lullaby” on the Triad Records label which flopped on the charts along with the single “I Want to Be With You.”
Jessi Colter Sings Just for Kids- Songs from Around the WorldAfter that, Jessi didn’t release any new albums until 1996 when she released her tenth album “Jessi Colter Sings Just for Kids: Songs Around the World” on the Peter Pan record label

The album (which was her first and only children’s music album) featured a guest appearance by Waylon Jennings, who recited some of his poetry for the video of the album.

In 2000, Jessi appeared on Waylon Jennings’ live album “Never Say Never.” In 2002, Waylon Jennings passed away at the age of 64.
Out Of The AshesIn 2006, Jessi released her eleventh album (and first studio album in over 20 years) called “Out of the Ashes” which peaked at #61 on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart. The album reflected on her husband’s death and received positive feedback from critics.

In 2007, she and Deana Carter recorded a duet version of Jessi’s 1975 hit song “I’m Not Lisa” for Deana’s album “The Chain.”

In 2017, Jessi and Jan Howard provided guest vocals on Jeannie Seely’s album “Written in Song” on the track “We’re Still Hangin’ In There Ain’t We Jessi.”
The PsalmsDuring that same year, she released her 12th album “The Pslams” on the Legacy record label. The album consisted of Jessi’s favorite passages from the Book of Psalms that were put to music.
Lady- A Memoir of Music, Life with Waylon, and the Faith That Brought Me HomeIn April of 2017, Jessi released a tell-all memoir called “Lady: A Memoir of Music, Life with Waylon, and the Faith That Brought Me Home.”

To see Jessi’s official website, go to:
http://www.officialjessicolter.com/index-alt.html

To see Jessi’s official Facebook page, go to:
https://www.facebook.com/OfficialJessiColter/

To see a fan-made video for “Lonesome Road” (released under her birth name “Mirriam Johnson”), go to:

To see a fan-made video for “I Ain’t the One” (with Waylon Jennings), go to:

To see a video of Lisa performing “I’m Not Lisa,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “What’s Happened to Blue Eyes,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “It’s Morning (And I Still Love You),” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Without You,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “I Thought I Heard You Calling My Name,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “I Belong to Him,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Maybe You Should’ve Been Listening,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Love Me Back to Sleep,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Holdin’ On,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “I Want to Be With You,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Suspicious Minds” (with Waylon Jennings), go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Under Your Spell” (with Waylon Jennings), go to:

To see a video of Jessi and Waylon Jennings performing “Storms Never Last,” go to:

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Kellie CoffeyKellie Coffey (born on April 22, 1971 in Moore, Oklahoma) is a country music singer-songwriter from the 2000s.

When she was 9 years old, Kellie performed regularly on the Oklahoma Opry. She graduated from Westmoore High School in 1989 and while attending the University of Oklahoma for college, Kellie performed in various musicals.

Later on, Kellie moved to Los Angeles, California where she lived in a friend’s apartment. During that time, she sang demos (along with music used by the Walt Disney Company), appeared on the TV series “Walker, Texas Ranger” and even sang backing vocals for Barbra Streisand at a show in Las Vegas.

After performing at a showcase at a Los Angeles restaurant, she was signed to a publishing contract with Warner/Chappell Music. Kellie later moved to Nashville, Tennessee where she auditioned for recording contracts. In 2001, she was signed to a record deal with BNA Records.
When You Lie Next To Me singleIn December of 2001, Kellie released her debut single “When You Lie Next to Me” which peaked at #8 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart, staying on the chart for 33 weeks.

The song also crossed over to the pop music charts, peaking at #54 on the Billboard Hot 100 (making it her only appearance on the Hot 100 to date) and peaked at #14 on Billboard’s Adult Contemporary chart as well.
When You Lie Next To MeIn May of 2002, she released her debut album “When You Lie Next to Me” which peaked at #54 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #5 on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart.
at the end of the dayThe follow-up single from the album “At the End of the Day” peaked at #18 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart, staying on the chart for 26 weeks and also at #8 on Billboard’s Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart.

The last single released from the album “Whatever It Takes” peaked at #44 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart, staying on the chart for only 10 weeks.

In May of 2003, Kellie won the award for “Top New Female Vocalist” at the Academy of Country Music Awards. During that same year, she went on tour with Kenny Chesney.
Texas PlatesIn late 2003, Kellie released the single “Texas Plates” which peaked at #24 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart, staying on the chart for 22 weeks.

She later followed up with a cover version of Luther Vandross’s song “Dance With My Father” which peaked at #41 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart, staying on the chart for 11 weeks. The two songs were supposed to appear on Kellie’s sophomore album called “A Little More Me,” but for unknown reasons, the album was never released.

Kellie continued to tour with singer George Strait until 2004 when she was dropped by her record label and her managers.
walk onAfter that, not much was heard from Kellie until 2007 when she self-released her sophomore album “Walk On.” She co-wrote 11 out of the 12 songs on the album. To promote the lead single from the album “I Would Die for That,” Kellie released a promotional video on YouTube.

The following year, Kellie did a campaign with the Susan G. Komen Foundation in the production for the title track of her sophomore album and the video features documentary footage of people participating in breast cancer walks.
Why I'm AliveIn November of 2009, she released the EP “Why I’m Alive.” A year later in 2010, she was the subject of a feature documentary film called “Kellie Coffey: I’m Still Here.”

In 2013, Kellie performed at Toby Keith’s “Twister Relief” concert, opening up for Trisha Yearwood and Garth Brooks in front of 65,000 people. She was also asked by the governor of Oklahoma to sing on a live television broadcast of a prayer service for the survivors & victims of the tornado that occurred in Moore, Oklahoma.

These days, Kellie continues to still be active with her music career and is also a married mother of two children. She continues to write & record songs, and is currently recording with singer Richard Carpenter.

She continues to work with the Walt Disney Company where her voice can be heard at Epcot’s Illuminations show and during their Christmas event “Believe in Holiday Magic.” Her voice was even heard on a national advertising campaign for Disneyland’s 40th anniversary.

To see Kellie’s official website, go to:
http://www.kelliecoffey.com/

To see the music video for “When You Lie Next to Me,” go to:

To see the music video for “Whatever It Takes,” go to:

To see the music video for “Texas Plates,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Dance With My Father,” go to:

To see the music video for “I Would Die For That,” go to:

To see the music video for “Walk On,” go to:

Margie Martinee

Leave Me This Way (Why Oh Why?)

Margie Martinee was a female freestyle/dance music singer from the early ’90s. Not much information is given about her, but she was signed to the Metropolitan Recording Corporation label.

In 1991, she released the single “Leave Me This Way (Why Oh Why)?” which didn’t appear to make the Billboard charts at all.
Distant EmotionsA year later, she released her second single “Distant Emotions” which also didn’t make the charts at all either.

After that, it seems as if Margie Martinee has faded into obscurity. Nothing much has been heard from her since the ’90s.

To see a fan-made video for “Leave Me This Way” (Why Oh Why?),” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Distant Emotions,” go to:

Kristin Baio
Kristin Baio was a freestyle/dance music singer from the late ’80s/early ’90s. Not much information is given about her, but she released singles under two different record labels.
Don't Turn Your Back On LoveIn 1988, she released her debut single “Don’t Turn Your Back On Love” on Vendetta Records which peaked at #18 on Billboard’s Hot Dance Music\Club Play chart, staying on the chart for 7 weeks.
Keep On Runnin'After that, not much was heard from Kristin until 1992 when she released the single “Keep On Runnin'” on the Metropolitan Recording Corporation record label which didn’t appear to make the charts at all.

After the release of her second single, it seems as if Kristin Baio has faded into obscurity. It’s unknown what she is up to these days.

To see a fan-made video for “Don’t Turn Your Back On Love,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Keep On Runnin’,” go to:

Pleasure

PleasurePleasure was an R&B band from Portland, Oregon that consisted of lead singer Sherman Davis, guitarist Marlon “The Magician” McClain, bassist Nathaniel Phillips, keyboardist Donald Hepburn, drummer Bruce Carter, saxophonist Dennis Springer and trombonist Dan Brewster. The band formed in 1972.

In 1974, Wayne Henderson of The Crusaders saw the band performing in a club in Portland and his interest in them lead to Pleasure getting a record deal with Fantasy Records.
Dust Yourself OffA year later in 1975, Pleasure released their debut album “Dust Yourself Off” which peaked at #54 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart.
Midnight At The OasisThe only single released from the album, a cover version of Maria Muldaur’s hit song “Midnight at the Oasis” didn’t appear to make the charts at all.
Accept No SubstitutesIn 1976, the band released their sophomore album “Accept No Substitutes” which peaked at #162 on the Billboard 200 and #32 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart.
Ghettos Of The MindThe only single to chart from the album was “Ghettos of the Mind” which peaked at #71 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 8 weeks.
JoyousIn 1977, Pleasure released their third album “Joyous” which peaked at #113 on the Billboard 200 chart and #34 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart.
JoyousThe title song peaked at #35 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 16 weeks.
Get To The FeelingIn 1978, they released their fourth album “Get to the Feeling.” Even though the album peaked at #119 on the Billboard 200 and #42 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart, the title song and the track “Happiness” (which were released as singles) didn’t make the charts.
Future NowIn 1979, Pleasure released their fifth album “Future Now” which peaked at #67 on the Billboard 200 and #13 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart.
Future NowThe title song peaked at #75 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for only 4 weeks.
GlideThe follow-up single from the album “Glide” became a hit for the band, peaking at #55 on the Billboard Hot 100, #10 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart (staying on the chart for 20 weeks) and #75 on Billboard’s Disco Top 100 chart.
The Real ThingThe last single from the album “The Real Thing” peaked at #65 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for only 5 weeks
Special ThingsIn 1980, Pleasure released their sixth album “Special Things” which peaked at #97 on the Billboard 200 and #27 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart. It was their last album released on Fantasy Records.
Yearnin' Burnin'The track “Yearnin’, Burnin'” peaked at #30 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 13 weeks.
Now You Choose MeThe follow-up single from the album “Now You Choose Me” peaked at #56 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 7 weeks. Another track from the album “Spread That Feelin’ (All Around)” peaked at #95 on Billboard’s Disco Top 100 chart.
Give It UpIn 1981, Pleasure released their last album “Give It Up” on the RCA Victor label which peaked at #164 on the Billboard 200 and #30 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart.
Sending My LoveThe lead single “Sending My Love” peaked at #27 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 16 weeks.
Give It UpThe title song peaked at #80 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for only 4 weeks. After the release of their last album, Pleasure disbanded.

Marlon McClain went on to write and produce songs for artists such as Kenny G., Nu Shooz, the Jeff Lorber Fusion, Gerald Albright, Curtis Salgado, Eric Benet, Tower of Power, En Vogue, George Benson and the Dazz Band (where he played guitar in the band from 1985 to 2001). In 1981, he released a solo album called “Changes.”

According to research, he resides in Los Angeles, California where he is the president of Mac Man Music Inc.

Bruce Carter appeared on albums by artists such as Gabor Szabo, Kenny G. and Roy Ayers. On August 12, 2006, he passed away from a heart attack.

Nathaniel Phillips appears to still be active in the music business. He has worked with artists such as Gerald Albright, Herb Alpert, Kirk Whalum and Jonathan Butler.

He was also a part of the Dazz Band along with Marlon McClain and recorded for the trio music project “Shades of Soul” with Jeff Lorber. These days, Nathaniel performs on the Smooth Jazz Cruise.

Dennis Springer has pursued a solo career himself; in 1997, he released an album called “Rio.” It’s unknown what he’s currently up to these days.

As for the other members of Pleasure, it’s unknown what they are up to these days and have seemingly fallen into obscurity.

To see a fan-made video for “Midnight at the Oasis,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Ghettos of the Mind,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Joyous,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Future Now,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Glide,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Get to the Feeling,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Happiness,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “The Real Thing,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Yearnin’ Burnin’,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Now You Choose Me,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Spread That Feelin’ (All Around),” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Sending My Love,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Give It Up,” go to:

The Breekout Krew

Matt's MoodThe Breekout Krew was a hip-hop/dance music duo from the ’80s. Not much information is given about them, but they were signed to Next Plateau Records.

In 1984, they released a single called “Matt’s Mood” which peaked at #51 on the U.K. Singles chart, but not in the United States.

After that, it seems as if the Breekout Krew has faded into obscurity. Nothing much has been heard from them since the ’80s.

To see a fan-made video for “Matt’s Mood,” go to:

back stabbersBig Mama Duke was a dance/electronic music artist from the ’90s. Not much information is given about this artist, but she was signed to the High Power Records label.

In 1993, she released the single “Back Stabbers.” It’s unknown how or if the single made any impact on the charts at all.

After that, it seems as if Big Mama Duke has faded into obscurity. Nothing much has been heard from her since the ’90s.

To see a fan-made video for “Back Stabbers,” go to:

karen brooksKaren Brooks (born on April 30, 1954 in Dallas, Texas) is a country music singer-songwriter from the ’80’s and ’90s.

During the ’70s, Karen provided vocals for artists such as Gary P. Nunn, Jerry Jeff Walker, David Allan Coe and Steve Fromholtz. She has also written songs for artists such as Emmylou Harris, Rosanne Cash and Tracy Nelson. She later headed to California where she worked alongside country singer Rodney Crowell where she got a record deal with Warner Bros. Records.
walk onIn 1982, Karen released her debut album “Walk On” which peaked at #38 on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart.

The lead single from the album “New Way Out” peaked at #17 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 19 weeks, making it the highest charting single from the album.

The follow-up single “If That’s What You’re Thinking” peaked at #21 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 14 weeks. The title song peaked at #30 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 12 weeks.

During 1982, Karen recorded a duet with singer T.G. Sheppard called “Faking Love” which topped Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart for a week in February of 1983.
Hearts On FireIn 1984, she released her sophomore album “Hearts on Fire” which peaked at #40 on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart.
Born To Love YouThe first single “Born to Love You” peaked at #40 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 11 weeks. The second single “Tonight I’m Here With Someone Else” peaked at #19 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 16 weeks.
A Simple I Love YouThe last single released from the album “A Simple I Love You” peaked at #63 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for only 8 weeks.
I Will Dance With YouIn 1985, Karen released her third album “I Will Dance With You” which failed to chart at all.
I Will Dance With You singleThe only track from the album to make the charts was the title song (featuring Johnny Cash) which peaked at #45 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 9 weeks.
That's Another StoryAfter that, nothing much was heard from Karen until 1992 when she released an album with Randy Sharp called “That’s Another Story” on Mercury Records.
Baby I'm The OneThe tracks “Baby I’m the One” and “That’s Another Story” were released as singles, but didn’t make the charts.

After that it seemed as if Karen Brooks has faded into obscurity, but according to research, it appears that she is now dabbling in art these days.

To see a website featuring Karen’s artwork, go to:
http://gotartwork.com/Profile/karen-brooks/2399/

To see a fan-made video for “Faking Love” (with T.G. Sheppard), go to:

To see a fan-made video for “New Way Out,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “If That’s What You’re Thinking,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Walk On,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Born to Love You,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Tonight I’m Here With Someone Else,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “A Simple I Love You,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “I Will Dance With You” (with Johnny Cash), go to:

To see the music video for “Baby I’m the One” (with Randy Sharp), go to:

To see a fan-made video for “That’s Another Story,” go to:

brentwoodBrentwood was a country music trio from Nashville, Tennessee that consisted of members Jay Kencke, Kenny Wrinn and Ron Freeman. They were signed to the Hot Schatz record label.


In 1982, they released the singles “Katy Bar the Door” and “Make a Little Hay” which didn’t appear to make the charts at all.
anything for your love
In 1983, Brentwood released their only album “Anything For Your Love.” It’s unknown how or if the album charted at all.
Love The One You're With
The first single from the album, a cover version of Stephen Stills’ song “Love the One You’re With” peaked at #96 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart. The title song peaked at #80 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, making it their highest and only chart appearance to date.

After that, it seems as if Brentwood has faded into obscurity. It’s unknown what the members are up to these days.

To see a fan-made video for “Make a Little Hay,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Love the One You’re With,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Anything For Your Love,” go to:

Abby

abbyAbby was a female dance singer from the late ’80s. Not much information is given about her, but she was signed to the Nightwave Records label.
take my heartIn 1987, she released her only single “Take My Heart.” It’s unknown how or if the single made the charts at all.

After that, it seems as if Abby has faded into obscurity. Nothing much has been heard from her since the ’80s.

To see a fan-made video for “Take My Heart,” go to: