Category: 80’s


Diane Richards

Diane RichardsDiane Richards (born in 1957 from Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is a former disco\R&B singer from the ’80s. Not much information is given about her, but she was signed to the Zoo York Recordz label.
Listen To Your Heart albumIn 1983, she released her only album “Listen To Your Heart.” It’s unknown how or if the album made the charts at all.
You Got It (You Got It All)The album contained cover versions of Diana Ross’s song “You Got It (You Got It All)” (which was released as a single, but didn’t chart) and Barry White’s song “It’s Ecstasy When You Lay Down Next To Me.”
Listen To Your Heart singleDiane’s only charting single to date was “Listen to Your Heart” which peaked at #44 on Billboard’s Black Singles chart, staying on the chart for 12 weeks.

After that, nothing much was heard from Diane and it seems as if she has faded into obscurity. It’s unknown what she’s up to these days.

To see a video for a remixed version of “Listen To Your Heart,” go to:

To see a video for “Forget About Your Lady” (from the “Listen to Your Heart” album), go to:

To see a video for “I Want to Do It With You” (from the “Listen to Your Heart” album), go to:

Advertisements

Donna Fargo

donna fargoDonna Fargo (born Yvonne Vaughn on November 10, 1945 in Mount Airy, North Carolina) is a country music singer from the ’70s.

Prior to her music career, Donna worked as a teacher in Covina, California at Northview High School and eventually became the head of the English Department.

While living in California, she met a man named Stan Silver, who became her manager when she was performing in clubs in California and first began pursuing a career in music; at this point, she was still teaching. In 1968, she married Stan Silver.

During the late ’60s, she recorded for a few small record labels, releasing singles such as “Who’s Been Sleeping on My Side of the Bed,” “Kinda Glad I’m Me,” “Would You Believe a Lifetime”, “All That’s Keeping Me Alive” and “Daddy,” but neither of them generated much success; howeer, she was named the “Top New Female Vocalist” award by the Academy of Country Music Awards in 1969.
the happiest girl in the whole usa singleIn 1972, Donna released the single “The Happiest Girl in the Whole U.S.A.” (which she wrote herself) which was picked up by the Dot Records label, who then signed her to a record deal.

The song became a hit, topping Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart for three weeks and stayed on the chart for 23 weeks; it also managed to cross over to the pop charts, peaking at #11 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #7 on Billboard’s Easy Listening Singles chart.

“The Happiest Girl in the Whole U.S.A.” also won two Academy of Country Music Awards for “Song of the Year” and “Single of the Year”, and even won a Grammy Award for “Best Female Country Vocal Performance.”

At the time, Donna was one of the few female country music singers to write her own material and one of the few country music singers to cross over to the Billboard Hot 100 in a big way.
The Happiest Girl In The Whole U.S.A. albumIn May of that same year, Donna released her debut album “The Happiest Girl in the Whole U.S.A.” which peaked at #47 on the Billboard 200 and topped Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart.

In early 1973, the album was certified Gold by the RIAA, selling over 500,000 copies and also won an Academy of Country Music Award for “Album of the Year.”
funny faceThe follow-up single from the album “Funny Face” became Donna’s second number-one song on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, topping the chart for 3 weeks and staying on the chart for 16 weeks. It also peaked at #5 on the Billboard Hot 100 (making it her only highest-charting single on the Hot 100 to date) and #5 on Billboard’s Easy Listening chart.
My Second AlbumIn February of 1973, Donna released her sophomore album, “My Second Album” which peaked at #104 on the Billboard 200 chart and topped Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart.

The lead single from the album, “Superman” became Donna’s third number-one song on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, topping the chart for a week and stayed on the chart for 14 weeks; it also peaked at #41 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #35 on Billboard’s Easy Listening chart.

The follow-up single, “You Were Always There” topped Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart (making it Donna’s fourth number-one hit on the chart) for a week and stayed on the chart for 14 weeks; it also peaked at #93 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #47 on Billboard’s Easy Listening chart.
all about a feelingIn October of 1973, Donna released her third album, “All About a Feeling” which peaked at #5 on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart, but didn’t make the Billboard 200.
Little Girl GoneThe lead single, “Little Girl Gone” peaked at #2 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 14 weeks, becoming Donna’s first song not to top the country music charts. The song also peaked at #57 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #43 on Billboard’s Easy Listening chart.

The follow-up single from the album, “I’ll Try a Little Bit Harder” peaked at #6 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 12 weeks.
Miss Donna FargoIn 1974, she released her fourth album, “Miss Donna Fargo” which peaked at #4 on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart.
You Can't Be A Beacon (If Your Light Don't Shine)The single “You Can’t Be a Beacon If Your Light Don’t Shine” topped Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart for a week (making it Donna’s fifth number-one song on the chart) and stayed on the chart for 15 weeks. It also peaked at #57 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #14 on Billboard’s Easy Listening chart.
U S Of AThe follow-up single, “U.S. of A.” peaked at #86 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #9 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 15 weeks.

The last single released from the album, “It Do Feel Good” peaked at #7 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart and #98 on the Billboard Hot 100 (making it Donna’s last appearance on the Hot 100 chart to date).
Whatever I Say Means I Love YouIn July of 1975, she released her fifth album, “Whatever I Say Means I Love You” which peaked at #28 on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart.
Hello Little BluebirdThe lead single from the album, “Hello Little Bluebird” peaked at #14 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 14 weeks.

The follow-up singles: “Whatever I Say (Means I Love You)” (which peaked at #38), “What Will the New Year Bring” (which peaked at #58) and “You’re Not Charlie Brown (And I’m Not Raggedy Ann)” (which peaked at #60) were moderately successful on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart.
on the moveIn 1976, Donna moved to Warner Bros. Records after Dot Records was acquired by the ABC Records label; during that same year, she released her sixth album “On the Move” which peaked at #31 on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart.

The two singles released from the album “Mr. Doodles” (which peaked at #20) and “I’ve Loved You All of the Way” (which peaked at #15) were also moderately successful on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart.
The Best Of Donna FargoIn 1977, Donna released her first compliation album, “The Best of Donna Fargo” which peaked at #9 on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart.

The lead single from the album, “Don’t Be Angry” peaked at #3 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 9 weeks. The follow-up single “I’d Love You to Want Me” failed to chart at all.
Fargo CountryDuring that same year, she released her seventh album, “Fargo Country” which peaked at #11 on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart.
Mockingbird HillThe single, “Mockingbird Hill” peaked at #9 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 13 weeks.

The follow-up single from the album, “That Was Yesterday” topped Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart for a week, (staying on the chart for 14 weeks), becoming Donna’s last song to top the chart.
Shame On MeIn 1978, Donna released her eighth album “Shame on Me” which peaked at #18 on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart.

The first two singles “Shame on Me” (which peaked at #8) and “Do I Love You (Yes in Every Way)” (which peaked at #2) managed to make the Top 10 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart; the last single released from the album, “Raga Muffin Man” peaked at #19 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart.
Dark-Eyed LadyDuring that same year, she released her ninth album, “Dark Eyed Lady” peaked at #20 on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart.

The two singles released from the album “Another Goodbye” (which peaked at #10) and “Somebody Special” (which peaked at #6) also made the Top 10 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart.

In 1978, Donna was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis; she experienced a brief illness, but she managed to return to excellent health with medical treatment and the help of her husband. She returned to a more limited schedule in 1979.
just for youIn 1979, Donna released her tenth album “Just for You” which became Donna’s first album not to make Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart.
daddyThe lead single from the album, “Daddy” (which was a new version of the song Donna recorded back in 1969) peaked at #14 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 13 weeks.

The follow-up singles from the album, “Preacher Berry” (which peaked at #45) and “Walk on By” (which peaked at #43) were moderately successful on Billboard’s Hot Country Albums chart.
FargoIn 1980, Donna released her eleventh album, “Fargo” which would become her last album for Warner Bros. Records. The only singles from the album to make Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart were: “Land of Cotton” (which peaked at #63) and “Seeing is Believing” (which peaked at #55).
Brotherly LoveIn 1981, Donna released her twelfth and first gospel music album called “Brotherly Love” on the MCA\Songbird record label; it’s unknown how the album charted at all.

During that same year, she released the singles: “Lone Star Cowboy” (which peaked at #73 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart) and “Jacamo” (which peaked at #72 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart).
donna fargo 1983In 1983, Donna released her self-titled thirteenth album on RCA Records; the album didn’t not make any album charts at all.

The lead single from the album, “It’s Hard to Be a Dreamer (When I Used to Be the Dream)” peaked at #40 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 3 weeks. The follow-up single “Did We Have to Go This Far (To Say Goodbye)” flopped, peaking at #80 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 4 weeks.
The Sign Of The TimesIn 1983, Donna released the single “The Sign Of The Times” on Columbia Records which peaked at #72 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 4 weeks.

A year later, she released another single, “My Heart Will Always Belong to You” on the Cleveland International Records label; the song peaked at #80 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 4 weeks.
WinnersIn 1986, Donna released her last album to date, “Winners” on Mercury Records; the album didn’t not make any album charts at all.

The lead single from the album, “Woman of the ’80s” which peaked at #58 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 8 weeks. The second single, “Me and You” reached the Top 30, peaking at #29 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 17 weeks.

The last single released from the album, “Members Only” (a duet with singer Billy Joe Royal) peaked at #23 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles chart, staying on the chart for 15 weeks.
Soldier BoyIn 1991, she released the single “Soldier Boy” on the Cleveland International Records label; the song peaked at #71 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart, staying on the chart for 2 weeks, making it Donna’s last charting single to date.

By the ’90s, Donna had left the music business and began pursuing other careers outside of music such as writing poetry and establishing a line of greeting cards. In 2008, she released a single CD called “We Can Do Better in America.”

According to research, Donna suffered from a stroke in December of 2017; as of February of this year, she is still recovering from the stroke.

To see a fan-made video for “The Happiest Girl in the Whole U.S.A.,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Funny Face,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Superman,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “You Were Always There,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Little Girl Gone,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “You Can’t Be a Beacon If Your Light Don’t Shine,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “US of A,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Hello Little Bluebird,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “That Was Yesterday,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Do I Love You (Yes in Every Way),” go to:

To see a fan-made video for”Somebody Special,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “It’s Hard to Be a Dreamer (When I Used to Be the Dream),” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Members Only” (with Billy Joe Royal), go to:

alexander o'neal
Hello, music fans! Today is Alexander O’Neal’s 65th birthday.

In honor of his special day (and since he’s one of my favorite rare & obscure music artists), I will be sharing videos of some of my favorite songs by him.

Enjoy the music!
P.S., happy birthday, Alexander O’Neal!

A Broken Heart Can Mend

Criticize

Never Knew Love Like This (with Cherrelle)

What’s Missing

What Can I Say to Make You Love Me

Sunshine

Crying Overtime

If You Were Here Tonight

The Lovers

Hearsay

Look At Us Now

All True Man

Keep It Inside (with Cherrelle)

Saturday Love (with Cherrelle)

Collette

ColletteCollette (born Collette Roberts in 1968 in Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand) is a former pop\dance music singer from the late ’80s\early ’90s.

Prior to her music career, Collette worked as a fashion model and relocated to Melbourne, Australia. In 1988, she began working with Australian film & TV composer, Guy Cross in Sydney, Australia to co-wrote material for her proposed music career.

After recording some demo tracks, they were taken to CBS Records Australia where Tony Briggs advised Collette to record a cover version of Anita Ward’s 1979 hit song “Ring My Bell.” After she recorded a demo of the song, Collette was signed to the CBS Records Australia label.
Ring My Bell
Collette’s version of “Ring My Bell” was released in February of 1989 and it became a hit, peaking at #5 on the ARIA Singles chart and #4 on the Official New Zealand Music Chart. It also managed to peak at #93 on the U.K. Singles chart (making it her only charting single in the United Kingdom).

The song was certified Gold in Australia by the Australian Recording Industry Association. In order to promote the single, Collette performed in bright fluorescent lycra clothing (such as bras, bike shorts and braces).
all i wanna do is danceHer follow-up single “All I Wanna Do Is Dance” which peaked at #12 on the ARIA Singles chart and #12 on the Official New Zealand Music Chart.
That's What I Like About YouIn October of 1989, she released her third single “That’s What I Like About You” which peaked at #31 on the ARIA Singles chart.
Raze The RoofDuring that same month, Collette released her debut album, “Raze the Roof” which peaked at #48 on the ARIA Albums chart.
Attitude In 1990, she developed a new image of short hair and black clothing in order to be taken more seriously as a singer. In April of that same year, Collette released her sophomore album “Attitude” which peaked at #107 on the ARIA Albums chart.
Who Do You Think You Are?The lead single from the album “Who Do You Think You Are?” peaked at #56 on the ARIA Singles chart.

The second single “Upside Down” peaked at #91 on the ARIA Singles chart; the last single released from the album “This Will Be (Everlasting Love)” peaked at #122 on the ARIA Singles chart.

In late 1991, Collette briefly starred on the Australian soap opera “Home and Away.” In 1995, she retired from the music business and worked as a stylist & a make-up artist.

In 2006, Collette appeared on Channel 7’s TV show, “Where Are They Now?” where she revealed that she does volunteer work at Taronga Zoo in Sydney, Australia. According to research, it’s currently unknown what she is up to these days.

To see the music video for “Ring My Bell,” go to:

To see the music video for “All I Wanna Do Is Dance,” go to:

To see the music video for “That’s What I Like About You,” go to:

To see the music video for “Who Do You Think You Are?”, go to:

To see the music video for “Upside Down,” go to:

To see the music video for “This Will Be (Everlasting Love),” go to:

Dynasty

dynasty

Dynasty was an R&B band from Los Angeles, California that was created by producer Dick Griffey (who was also the head of the SOLAR Records label) and producer Leon Sylvers III (of R&B group The Sylvers). The members of the band consisted of Nidra Beard, Linda Carriere, Kevin Spencer, William Shelby, Richard Randolph and Leon Sylvers III.

Nidra and Linda first became friends when Linda moved from New Orleans, Louisiana to Los Angeles for college. The two of them were frequent visitors of a popular nightclub called Maverick’s Flat. The owner of the nighclub, John Daniels was in the process of forming a new music group called DeBlanc.

Nidra & Linda became members of the group and toured with them for two years until DeBlanc disbanded in 1975. Some of the other members of the group (along with Linda & Nidra) formed a new music group called Starfire where they toured in the United States and a few key dates in Iran & Finland.

After the tour, Starfire disbanded. Around that time, Nidra developed a strong relationship with Leon Sylvers III; at the time, she performed with the Sylvers as a fill-in on live dates for the female Sylvers, who were underaged at the time.

Kevin Spencer first met Leon Sylvers III when he appeared at the Sylvers’ home in Palo Verdes, California unannounced to audition as a bass player for the Sylvers and ended up becoming a member of Leon Sylvers III’ and Dick Griffey’s new band, Dynasty.
Your Piece Of The RockIn 1979, Dynasty released their debut album “Your Piece of the Rock” which peaked at #72 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart.
I Don't Want To Be A Freak (But I Can't Help Myself)The group’s first charting single “I Don’t Want To Be A Freak (But I Can’t Help Myself)” peaked at #36 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 14 weeks. It also peaked at #38 on Billboard’s Disco Top 100 chart and #20 on the U.K. Singles chart.

Another single from the album “It’s Still a Thrill\Satisfied” peaked at #38 on Billboard’s Disco Top 100 chart, staying on the chart for 15 weeks.
Adventures In The Land Of MusicIn 1980, they released their sophomore album, “Adventures in the Land of Music” which peaked at #11 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart.
I've Just Begun To Love YouThe lead single from the album “I’ve Just Begun to Love You” peaked at #87 on the Billboard Hot 100 (making their only highest charting single on the Hot 100 to date) and #6 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 19 weeks.

It also peaked at #51 on the U.K. Singles chart and #5 on Billboard’s Disco Top 100 chart (along with the track “Groove Control”).
Do Me RightThe follow-up single “Do Me Right” peaked at #34 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 16 weeks.
Something To RememberThe last single released from the album “Something to Remember” peaked at #64 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 6 weeks. The title song has been sampled by various artists such as Camp Lo, Brooke Valentine, Terri Walker, Jadakiss, Angie Stone and Wiz Khalifa.
The Second AdventureIn 1981, Dynasty released their third album “The Second Adventure” which peaked at #42 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart. During that same year, Leon Sylvers III joined the band.
here i amThe first single from the album “Here I Am” peaked at #26 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart (staying on the chart for 16 weeks) and #51 on Billboard’s Disco Top 80 chart (staying on the chart for 11 weeks).
Love In The Fast LaneThe follow-up single “Love in the Fast Lane” peaked at #31 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 12 weeks.
Right Back At Cha!In 1982, the band released their fourth album “Right Back at Cha!” which peaked at #54 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart.
Check It Out The first single from the album “Check It Out” peaked at #39 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 39 weeks.

The follow-up singles, “Strokin'” peaked at #52 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart and “Does That Ring” peaked at #53 on the U.K. Singles chart.

Four years later in 1986, Dynasty released their fifth album “Daydreamin'” which didn’t appear to make the charts along with the single “Personality.” During that time, Linda Carriere was no longer a member of the band.
out of control
In 1988, Dynasty released their last album to date, “Out of Control” which didn’t appear to make the album charts at all.

The lead single “Don’t Waste My Time” peaked at #41 on Billboard’s Hot Black Singles chart, staying on the chart for 10 weeks. The follow-up single from the album “Tell Me (Do You Want My Love)?” peaked at #56 on Billboard’s Hot Black Singles chart, staying on the chart for 9 weeks.

In 1989, Dynasty disbanded. In the years since they broke up, Nidra Beard continued working as a songwriter, Linda Carriere continued working as a background vocalist, William Shelby did some songwriting as well and Kevin Spencer returned to doing studio work.

As for Leon Sylvers III, he went on to have a successful career as a producer & songwriter and has worked with artists such as The Whispers, Blackstreet, Howard Hewett, Glenn Jones, Evelyn “Champagne” King, Five Star, Chubb Rock and The Brothers Johnson.

To see the music video for “I Don’t Want To Be A Freak (But I Can’t Help Myself),” go to:

To see the music video for “Do Me Right”, go to:

To see the music video for “I’ve Just Begun to Love You,” go to:

To see the music video for “Something to Remember,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Here I Am,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Love in the Fast Lane,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Check It Out,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Strokin’,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Does That Ring a Bell,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Personality,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Don’t Waste My Time”, go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Tell Me (Do You Want My Love)?”, go to:

As a bonus, here is a fan-made video for “Adventures in the Land of Music,” go to:

Toy

toyToy was an electro\hip-hop music act from the mid-’80s that was signed to the MDA Records label.

In 1985, Toy released the single “Party Nites.” It’s unknown how or if the single made any music charts at all. After that, it seems as if Toy faded into obscurity.

To see a fan-made video for “Party Nites,” go to:

Enchantment

EnchantmentEnchantment is an R&B group from Detroit, Michigan that first consisted of members Emanuel “E.J.” Johnson, Joe “Jobie” Thomas, Dave Banks, Ed “Mickey” Clanton and Bobby Green.

The group formed in the late ’60s at Pershing High School in Detroit. In 1969, they won first place in a talent contest (sponsored by local radio station WCHB) and got their first recording contract.

In 1970, Enchantment worked with a talent development agency for up & coming artists called Artists International (which was founded by manager Dick Scott, a former executive for Motown Records who managed artists such as Diana Ross and the Supremes & Boyz II Men) where they began developing their stage presence and performed at various gigs around the Detroit area.
Call On MeIn 1973, the group formed an alliance with producer Michael Stokes. In 1975, they released their debut single, “Call on Me” which didn’t make the charts at all. By 1976, Stokes had negotiated a record deal for Enchantment through his association with Fred Frank (who was the head of the Roadshow Records label).
Come On And RideDuring that same year, the group released their follow-up single, “Come On And Ride” which peaked at #67 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart and #37 on Billboard’s National Disco Action Top 40 chart.
GloriaAfter that, Enchantment changed their focus from disco music to writing ballads. Their third single, “Gloria” peaked at #25 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #5 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart (staying on the chart for 24 weeks).
Enchantment 1976 albumIn 1977, the group released their self-titled debut album which peaked at #104 on the Billboard 200 and #11 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart.
SunshineTheir next single released from the album, “Sunshine” peaked at #45 on the Billboard 200 and #3 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart (staying on the chart for 22 weeks).
Once Upon A DreamIn 1978, Enchantment released their sophomore album, “Once Upon a Dream” which peaked at #46 on the Billboard 200 and #8 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart.
It's You That I NeedThe lead single from the album, “It’s You That I Need” topped Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart for a week in February of 1978. It also crossed over to the pop charts where it peaked at #33 on the Billboard Hot 100.
If You're Ready (Here It Comes)The follow-up single, “If You’re Ready (Here It Comes)” peaked at #14 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 11 weeks.
Journey To The Land Of...EnchantmentIn 1979, Enchantment released their third album, “Journey to the Land Of… Enchantment” which peaked at #145 on the Billboard 200 and #25 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart.
Where Do We Go From HereThe first single, “Any Way You Want It” peaked at #38 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for only 9 weeks.
Where Do We Go From HereThe follow-up single from the album, “Where Do We Go From Here?” peaked at #29 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 13 weeks. By 1980, Roadshow Records folded and Enchantment went on to sign a new record deal with RCA Records.
Soft Lights, Sweet MusicDuring that same year, they released their fourth album, “Soft Lights, Sweet Music” which peaked at #65 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart. Also around that same year, Bobby Green was replaced by new member Carl Cotton.
Settin' It OutThe lead single from the album, “Settin’ It Out” peaked at #47 on Billboard’s Disco Top 100 chart (along with the track “Are You Ready For Love”), staying on the chart for 13 weeks.
Moment Of WeaknessThe follow-up single, “Moment of Weakness” peaked at #47 on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart, staying on the chart for 8 weeks. After that, Enchantment went on to sign a record deal with Columbia Records.
Enchanted LadyIn 1982, the group released their fifth album, “Enchanted Lady” which failed to make the album charts at all.
I Know Your Hot SpotThe only single from the album to chart was “I Know Your Hot Spot” which peaked at #45 on Billboard’s Black Singles chart, staying on the chart for 10 weeks.

In 1984, Enchantment released their last album to date, “Utopia” which also failed to make the album charts at all, but the single, “Don’t Fight the Feeling” managed to peak at #64 on Billboard’s Black Singles chart, staying on the chart for only 5 weeks.
Feel Like Dancin'
In 1985, the group released the single, “Feel Like Dancin'” on the Prelude Records label, but it didn’t appear to make any impact on the charts at all.
Reflections Of The Man Inside
After that, not much was heard from Enchantment until 1991 when they released the single, “Reflections of the Man Inside” on the Morning Glory record label; it’s unknown how or if the single charted at all.

In 2003, Carl Cotton (who replaced Bobby Green) was shot & killed in 2003 during an altercation with his barber outside of a party store in Detroit.

These days, it appears as if Enchantment is still performing regionally; Joe “Jobie” Thomas left the group and formed his own music group called Enchantment featuring Jobie Thomas.

To see a fan-made video for “Call on Me,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Come On and Ride,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Gloria,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Sunshine,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “It’s You That I Need,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “If You’re Ready (Here It Comes),” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Any Way You Want It,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Where Do We Go From Here,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Settin’ It Out,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Moment of Weakness,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “I Know Your Hot Spot,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Don’t Fight the Feeling,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Feel Like Dancin’,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “Reflections of the Man Inside,” go to:

nationalonehitwonderday

Hello, music fans! Today is National One Hit Wonder Day and in honor of this day, I will be posting videos of some of the one-hit wonders from the ’70s to the 2000s that I have covered on my blog throughout the years.

Enjoy!

1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

Merci-Mercy

If There's A ChanceMerci-Mercy was a freestyle\dance girl group that consisted of Marilyn “Mimi” Diaz, Patricia Mario, Dawn Rix and Roly Garcia.

Not much information is given about them, but they were signed to the Runaway Records label. In 1988, they released their debut single “If There’s a Chance” which didn’t appear to make any music charts.

The group’s follow-up singles “(I’m) Looking For Love” (released in 1989) and “Love Is Forever” (released in 1990) also failed to make any impact on the charts at all.

After that, it seems as if Merci-Mercy faded into obscurity. Nothing much has been heard from them since the early ’90s.

To see a fan-made video for “If There’s A Chance,” go to:

To see a fan-made video for “(I’m) Looking For Love,” go to:

Joey C ‎– All I'm AskingJoey C. was a freestyle\dance singer from the late ’80s. Not much information is given about him, but he was signed to the Jam On It record label.

In 1989, he released his only single, “All I’m Asking.” It’s unknown how or if the single made any impact on the charts.

After that, it seems as if Joey C. has faded into obscurity. Nothing much has been heard from him since the late ’80s.

To see a fan-made video for “All I’m Asking,” go to: